A transcription and analysis of so what a tune by miles davis

Compare this with "Freddie Freeloader," the album's only conventional blues. The tricky aspect to this, for some players, no matter what the level of experience might be, is that at one point, as the form turns around, you are faced with 48 straight bars of Dm7.

This in itself was nothing new. Russell threw the compass out the window. It can be easy to lose oneself in that, and then miss the modulation to Ebm7. The answer came from a friend of his named George Russell who died just last month at the age of As it was in the prior [B] section, his playing becomes a bit more linear again.

To learn and understand form is also a crucial element in the battle. Once I had completed the task, I was again struck by Miles' usage of space, the simplicity of the phrases, but the great depth of what he played and how he played it. This is why I feel that learning to improvise in simple modal contexts, using smaller challenges enables each player to arrive at a reward much sooner than trying to learn to play over a complex tune from the Bebop era.

Suddenly, I just decided to sit down and write it out.

Guest Post by Marc Adler: Autumn Smiles

In other words, for a guitarist reading along, it would sound perfect with Miles' trumpet. A work of art, art in its most minimalist form. It has always been my contention that, in taking the first steps, it is of vital importance to give the student a task which is not impossible to accomplish nor is it so difficult to understand the theories behind it.

So Kind of Blue sounded different from the jazz that came before it. It was and remains magical. This is why I believe that if, as in the case of "So What", you can learn these two simple Dorian modes and some very fundamental minor pentatonic ideas, you can, at the very least, be playing notes which always sound good so that you can then concentrate on just feeling as though you are in the flow of the time, the groove, of the music and can make your ideas sit within the music as a whole.

Evans was conservatory-trained with a penchant for the French Impressionist composers, like Ravel and Debussy, whose harmonies floated airily above the melody line. When one is trying to learn to improvise, whether it is to play "Jazz" or to operate within another genre, there always seems to be a rush to be playing as fast as one can, as soon as is possible.

This was a radical notion. For the remainder of this 8-bar section, he returns to his more pentatonic oriented phrases. When I did the tune with my former jazz group, I decided to just transcribe the missing sections myself.

His take on the melody is similarly minimalist, using many fewer notes than the original. Miles Davis'Kind of Blue, which was released 50 years ago today, is a nearly unique thing in music or any other creative realm: A brilliant composer and scholar in his own right, Russell spent the better part of the '50s devising a new theory of jazz improvisation based not on chord changes but on scales or "modes.

The jazz world was still waiting, longing, for "the next Charlie Parker" and wondering where he'd take the music. There was no sequel. Then, later inMonk finally got to record his tune for the first time.

The sound of Miles Davis, especially in the context of his recordings with Gil Evans became the voice of an era.

What is it about Kind of Blue that makes it not just pleasant but important?

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The departure from bebop is clear from the album's opening tune, "So What," which would emerge as this new sound's anthem.

Return to the corrected sentence. But what made it so great? Sincerity is the main factor — you can hear it in the music. Evans writes that, for "Flamenco Sketches," the improvisations on each scale can last "as long as the soloist wishes. Structurally, it's similar to the early bebop tunes that Davis played with Parker in the mids, the melody latched to the pianist's chord changes, which occur nearly every bar, as in this Parker recording of "Ornithology" with Davis as sideman: This is why I feel that learning to improvise in simple modal contexts, using smaller challenges enables each player to arrive at a reward much sooner than trying to learn to play over a complex tune from the Bebop era.

Kind of Blue is a one-shot deal, so dreamily perfect you can hardly believe someone created it. Evans was conservatory-trained with a penchant for the French Impressionist composers, like Ravel and Debussy, whose harmonies floated airily above the melody line.

They came to the date, were handed music that allowed them unprecedented freedom to sing their "own song," as Russell put itand they lived up to the challenge, usually on the first take; they had a lot of their own song to sing.

Davis hired Evans for his next recording date, the session that became Kind of Blue, which would be the perfect expression of this new approach to playing.

‘So What’ Analysis

Nothing ever sounded like that.The definitive version of “Round Midnight” is the one by Miles Davis, as recorded on his album ‘Round About Midnight (a widely used alternate name for the tune.) Miles honed this arrangement in performances for years before finally recording it.

"Fun" by Miles Davis 2 Miles Davis originally recorded this piece on January 11,and it wasn't released until as a part of compilation album "Directions". Feb 02,  · The Music of Miles Davis A Study and Analysis of Compositions and Solo Transcriptions5/5(2). November 11th, - Jazz solo transcription of Sonny Rollins on tune Bye Bye Blackbird recorded with Miles Davis Quintet on July 13 Miles Davis s Bye Bye Blackbird an analysis by leo izzo November 17th, - Transcript of Miles Davis s Bye Bye Blackbird November 8th, - Chet Baker solo on Bye bye blackbird C So what miles.

Miles Davis trumpet solo on So What - mp3 sound clips transcription and analysis by Steve Khan. Soundclip: I happened to hit upon the "Jazz Channel" offered by Music Choice® and I came upon Miles' solo over his own tune, "So What." Of course, I have heard this tune, this solo countless times, for pleasure, and for study.

Miles Davis: Miles' Styles Produced by Jim Luce Miles Davis was the personification of restless spirit, always pushing himself and his music into uncharted territory.

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A transcription and analysis of so what a tune by miles davis
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